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Book Review: The Promise by Robyn Carr

Copyright: 2014 by Robyn Carr
Genre: Contemporary romance, social issues

Do parents of a fifteen-year-old girl who is pregnant have the right to make her get an abortion? Does the girl have any rights? This issue was explored when Krissy, the daughter of Peyton Lacoumette’s ex-boyfriend called her in a panic, trying to stop her parents from forcing her into an abortion. Sadly, the child of divorced parents who were too busy fighting to give their children any attention, wanted someone to love her. This is often the reason often given by unmarried teenagers who become pregnant.

The Promise by Robyn Carr is primarily a romance novel. It is the fifth in the Thunder Point, Oregon series. Robyn Carr became a bestselling author when she wrote her 20-novel Virgin River series which told of the inhabitants of a small town, many of them ex-military men who migrated to the Virgin River, in the mountains of California. Thunder Point is a similar series, centering around a bit larger town on the coast of Oregon. There is less emphasis on the military in this set of books, with a town that is focused on football, primarily at the high school level. Most of Carr’s books include some exploration into social issues. The Promise centers on the story of town doctor, Scott Grant and Peyton Lacoumette, a physician’s assistant who applies for a temporary job in Scott’s office.

Scott is a widower with two young children. His wife died in childbirth four years previously. He feels he is ready to love again. However there are not a lot of unattached women in his life. Peyton has just escaped a bad relationship. She had worked for and lived with Ted, the divorced father of three teenage children. After a three year relationship she realized that she was nothing but a glorified babysitter for Ted’s kids (who hated her), and when she discovered he was cheating on her, she packed up and left the household. He promptly fired Peyton from her job and installed his new girlfriend in her positions in both his office and home. So, Peyton rides into Thunder Point, determined to restart her career and stay away from any man with children. She is immediately offered a job by Dr. Grant in the small clinic he owns, and she agrees to work there for three months even though the pay is much lower than she is accustomed to. Somehow, that very first day she ends up babysitting for his two preschool children. Scott is attracted to Peyton immediately but she holds back, fearful of a repeat of her last relationship.

In spite of the fact that he is a well-respected doctor, Scott is fairly innocent regarding love. He had married his high school sweetheart and they were happy through out their marriage. He dated a couple times after his wife’s death but the conversation usually turned to his wife. His social life most often revolved around activities with his two young children. Peyton, on the other hand, was a bit more experienced but had some definite problems with trust. Still, the couple fell in love and seemed destined to a future together until Peyton got the call from Krissy. Although she had never been close to the girl, she felt morally obligated to leave Thunder Point to help her.

I found this story to be rather slow moving with a heavy concentration on the love story. I realize this is probably what most people want but I like the social angles more than the love stories. Regardless, I am hooked on Robyn Carr and will read the next book in this series, The Homecoming, as soon as I can.

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